Margherita in the city

When Margherita was three years old, the Signory of Florence beheaded her father in the square in front of Palazzo Vecchio. He had backed the wrong side. In Florence they played politics for keeps. The family lost all its property and went into exile in Avignon. When Francesco says he understands how she would have been frightened, he said "it's what war is." He also says, of his lawyer who is staying in a village in the countryside:

"I think they’re able to stay safe, not having many goods, therfore it is country that the armed men will go through very unwillingly, after which it will be in some part safe; but I am not in raptures about the fact that the women are staying there because they are neither quick to flee nor to do what men are able to do."

I can imagine the kinds of thoughts that might go through the mind of a woman in charge of a house full of rich things, and food stored up against famine, in the possible path of armed men whose behaviour in the past inspired many a painting of the "Slaughter of the Innocents." Her husband was not with her. She had servants and friends. She was not isolated, but she was alone in her responsibility for the family.

The war in question was the second of three fought by republican Florence against the Visconti Dukes of Milan. Both states used mercenary armies. It was an army of Breton and English soldiers under the command of Sir John Hawkwood who over three nights murdered 6,000 people in the town of Cesena, tossing the bodies into ditches and wells to discourage the dogs who had been eating them. This had happened only 20 years before, with the acquiesance of the Pope, Gregory XI. It had been the year of Margherita and Francesco's marriage.

She had in one week gathered in all crops, animals and goods from two farms; she had seen to the care of the servants; she had arranged a loan to keep the household in Prato in cash; she was baking bread, and when she could find someone willing to risk the roads still sending it to Florence. And always she must have kept at bay the certain fear that at any time a violent end might strike her or her family.

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